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ASC Visualization Project: Smart Surfaces: Multi-resolution Surface Display
 

Surface Simplification | Terrain Visualization | ROAM: Realtime Optimally-Adapting Meshes | Contact

The ASC "Smart Surfaces" project plays host to a number of research efforts to improve the handling and display of extremely large surfaces. We have made great strides in expanding the potential information content of display devices. These display devices, and the rendering capacity to which they are attached, place an upper bound on the data output requirements of the interactive visualization problem. An interactive system need only generate geometric data commensurate to the target display, both in terms of the physical number of available pixels and the rendering engine capacity. At extreme datasets sizes, these output limitations generally dominate the system. In this sense, the entire visualization process can be considered a data reduction filter, whose goal is to efficiently and dynamically manage the processes of data selection, reduction and transformation, given a specific target display and specified user criteria.

By designing computational and rendering algorithms that are predominantly output sensitive, we can greatly reduce the computational requirements of scalable visualization systems. Hierarchical data structures are key not only to the development of output-sensitive view-dependent algorithms, which enable one to trade the accuracy of the final result for increased rate of interaction, but also to the design of progressive algorithms, which can be utilized to improve interactivity. The "Smart Surfaces" effort includes a number of projects that share this goal.

Sub-projects in this area include:

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Surface Simplification

One key approach to large surface handling is simplification. We are currently investigating a number of simplification approaches, but they are all characterized by the need to scale to the largest surfaces possible and, wherever possible, running on restrictive hardware targets.

Out-of-Core Simplification of Large Polygonal Models

Out-of-Core Simplification of Large Polygonal Models

We present an algorithm for out-of-core simplification of large polygonal datasets that are too complex to fit in main memory. The algorithm extends the vertex clustering scheme of Rossignac and Borrel [RB93] by using error quadric information for the placement of each cluster's representative vertex, which better preserves fine details and results in a low mean geometric error. The use of quadrics instead of the vertex grading approach in [RB93] has the additional benefits of requiring less disk space and only a single pass over the model rather than two. The resulting linear time algorithm allows simplification of datasets of arbitrary complexity.

To handle degenerate quadrics associated with (near) flat regions and regions with zero Gaussian curvature, we present a robust method for solving the corresponding underconstrained least-squares problem. The algorithm is able to detect these degeneracies and handle them gracefully. Key features of the simplification method include a bounded Hausdorff error, low mean geometric error, high simplification speed (up to 100,000 triangles/second reduction), output (but not input) sensitive memory requirements, no disk space overhead, and a running time that is independent of the order in which vertices and triangles occur in the input.

References:
Peter Lindstrom, Out-of-Core Simplification of Large Polygonal Models.
ACM SIGGRAPH 2000, pp. 259-262, July 2000.

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A Memory Insensitive Technique for Large Model Simplification

A Memory Insensitive Technique for Large Model Simplification

In this paper we propose three simple, but significant improvements to the OoCS (Out-of-Core Simplification) algorithm of Lindstrom [Lin00] which increase the quality of approximations and extend the applicability of the algorithm to an even larger class of compute systems.

The original OoCS algorithm has memory complexity that depends on the size of the output mesh, but no dependency on the size of the input mesh. That is, it can be used to simplify meshes of arbitrarily large size, but the complexity of the output mesh is limited by the amount of memory available. Our first contribution is a version of OoCS that removes the dependency of having enough memory to hold (even) the simplified mesh. With our new algorithm, the whole process is made essentially independent of the available memory on the host computer. Our new technique uses disk instead of main memory, but it is carefully designed to avoid costly random accesses.

Our two other contributions improve the quality of the approximations generated by OoCS. We propose a scheme for preserving surface boundaries which does not use connectivity information, and a scheme for constraining the position of the "representative vertex" of a grid cell to an optimal position inside the cell.

References:
Peter Lindstrom and Claudio T. Silva, A Memory Insensitive Technique for Large Model Simplification
IEEE Visualization 2001, pp. 121-126, 550, October 2001.

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Out-of-Core Construction and Visualization of Multiresolution Surfaces

Out-of-Core Construction and Visualization of Multiresolution Surfaces

Click on the image to see the related movie.

We present a method for end-to-end out-of-core simplification and view-dependent visualization of large surfaces. The method consists of three phases: (1) memory insensitive simplification; (2) memory insensitive construction of a multiresolution hierarchy; and (3) run-time, output-sensitive, view-dependent rendering and navigation of the mesh. The first two off-line phases are performed entirely on disk, and use only a small, constant amount of memory, whereas the run-time system pages in only the rendered parts of the mesh in a cache coherent manner. As a result, we are able to process and visualize arbitrarily large meshes given a sufficient amount of disk space; a constant multiple of the size of the input mesh.

Similar to recent work on out-of-core simplification, our memory insensitive method uses vertex clustering on a rectilinear octree grid to coarsen and create a hierarchy for the mesh, and a quadric error metric to choose vertex positions at all levels of resolution. We show how the quadric information can be used to concisely represent vertex position, surface normal, error, and curvature information for anisotropic view-dependent coarsening and silhouette preservation.

The run-time component of our system uses asynchronous rendering and view-dependent refinement driven by screen-space error and visibility. The system exploits frame-to-frame coherence and has been designed to allow preemptive refinement at the granularity of individual vertices to support refinement on a time budget.

Our results indicate a significant improvement in processing speed over previous methods for out-of-core multiresolution surface construction. Meanwhile, all phases of the method are disk and memory efficient, and are fairly straightforward to implement.

References:
Peter Lindstrom, Out-of-Core Construction and Visualization of Multiresolution Surfaces, ACM SIGGRAPH 2003 Symposium on Interactive 3D Graphics, to appear, April 2003.

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Large Mesh Simplification Using Processing Sequences

Large Mesh Simplification using Processing Sequences

In this paper we show how out-of-core mesh processing techniques can be adapted to perform their computations based on the new processing sequence paradigm [Isenburg and Gumhold 2003; Isenburg et al. 2003], using mesh simplification as an example. We believe that this processing concept will also prove useful for other tasks, such as parameterization, remeshing, or smoothing, for which currently only in-core solutions exist.

A processing sequence represents a mesh as a particular interleaved ordering of indexed triangles and vertices. This representation allows streaming very large meshes through main memory while maintaining information about the visitation status of edges and vertices. At any time, only a small portion of the mesh is kept in-core, with the bulk of the mesh data residing on disk. Mesh access is restricted to a fixed traversal order, but full connectivity and geometry information is available for the active elements of the traversal. This provides seamless and highly efficient out-of-core access to very large meshes for algorithms that can adapt their computations to this fixed ordering.

The two abstractions that are naturally supported by this representation are boundary-based and buffer-based processing. We illustrate both abstractions by adapting two different simplification methods to perform their computation using a prototype of our mesh processing sequence API. Both algorithms benefit from using processing sequences in terms of improved quality, more efficient execution, and smaller memory footprints.

References:
M. Isenburg, P. Lindstrom, S. Gumhold, and J. Snoeyink, Large Mesh Simplification Using Processing Sequences, Proceedings of IEEE, Visualization 2003, UCRL-200016-CONF

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Terrain Visualization

Several scalable terrain visualization projects are currently under way in the group.

Visualization of Large Terrains Made Easy

Visualization of Large Terrains Made Easy

Click on the image to see the related movie.

We present an elegant and simple to implement framework for performing out-of-core visualization and view-dependent refinement of large terrain surfaces. Contrary to the recent trend of increasingly elaborate algorithms for large-scale terrain visualization, our algorithms and data structures have been designed with the primary goal of simplicity and efficiency of implementation. Our approach to managing large terrain data also departs from more conventional strategies based on data tiling. Rather than emphasizing how to segment and efficiently bring data in and out of memory, we focus on the manner in which the data is laid out to achieve good memory coherency for data accesses made in a top-down (coarse-to-fine) refinement of the terrain. We present and compare the results of using several different data indexing schemes, and propose a simple to compute index that yields substantial improvements in locality and speed over more commonly used data layouts.

Our second contribution is a new and simple, yet easy to generalize method for view-dependent refinement. Similar to several published methods in this area, we use longest edge bisection in a top-down traversal of the mesh hierarchy to produce a continuous surface with subdivision connectivity. In tandem with the refinement, we perform view frustum culling and triangle stripping. These three components are done together in a single pass over the mesh. We show how this framework supports virtually any error metric, while still being highly memory and compute efficient.

References:
Peter Lindstrom and Valerio Pascucci, Visualization of Large Terrains Made Easy,
IEEE Visualization 2001, pp. 363-370, 574, October 2001.

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Terrain Simplification Simplified: A General Framework for View-Dependent Out-of-Core Visualization

Terrain Simplification Simplified: A General Framework for View-Dependent Out-of-Core Visualization

Click on the image to see the related movie.

This paper describes a general framework for out-of-core rendering and management of massive terrain surfaces. The two key components of this framework are: view-dependent refinement of the terrain mesh; and a simple scheme for organizing the terrain data to improve coherence and reduce the number of paging events from external storage to main memory. Similar to several previously proposed methods for view-dependent refinement, we recursively subdivide a triangle mesh defined over regularly gridded data using longest-edge bisection. As part of this single, per-frame refinement pass, we perform triangle stripping, view frustum culling, and smooth blending of geometry using geomorphing. Meanwhile, our refinement framework supports a large class of error metrics, is highly competitive in terms of rendering performance, and is surprisingly simple to implement.

Independent of our refinement algorithm, we also describe several data layout techniques for providing coherent access to the terrain data. By reordering the data in a manner that is more consistent with our recursive access pattern, we show that visualization of gigabyte-size data sets can be realized even on low-end, commodity PCs without the need for complicated and explicit data paging techniques. Rather, by virtue of dramatic improvements in multilevel cache coherence, we rely on the built-in paging mechanisms of the operating system to perform this task. The end result is a straightforward, simple-to-implement, pointerless indexing scheme that dramatically improves the data locality and paging performance over conventional matrix-based layouts.

References:
Peter Lindstrom and Valerio Pascucci, Terrain Simplification Simplified: A General Framework for View-Dependent Out-of-Core Visualization, UCRL-JC-147847,
IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, 8(3), pp. 239-254, July-September 2002.

For more information, please contact: Peter Lindstrom.