Topic: Open-Source Software

This open-source file system framework supports hierarchical HPC storage systems by utilizing node-local burst buffers.

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Highlights include CASC director Jeff Hittinger's vision for the center as well as recent work with PruneJuice DataRaceBench, Caliper, and SUNDIALS.

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BLT software supports HPC software development with built-in CMake macros for external libraries, code health checks, and unit testing.

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MacPatch provides LLNL with enterprise system management for desktop and laptop computers running Mac OS X.

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A new software model helps move million-line codes to various hardware architectures by automating data movement in unique ways.

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Highlights include Computation’s annual external review, machine learning for ALE simulations, CFD modeling for low-carbon solutions, seismic modeling, and an in-line floating point compression tool.

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SOAR (Stateless, One-pass Adaptive Refinement) is a view-dependent mesh refinement and rendering algorithm.

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Sphinx, an integrated parallel microbenchmark suite, consists of a harness for running performance tests and extensive tests of MPI, Pthreads and OpenMP.

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Highlights include the HYPRE library, recent data science efforts, the IDEALS project, and the latest on the Exascale Computing Project.

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Apollo, an auto-tuning extension of RAJA, improves performance portability in adaptive mesh refinement, multi-physics, and hydrodynamics codes via machine learning classifiers.

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Large Linux data centers require flexible system management. At Livermore Computing, we are committed to supporting our Linux ecosystem at the high end of commodity computing.

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LibRom is a library designed to facilitate Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) based Reduced Order Modeling (ROM).

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Babel is a high-performance language interoperability tool. The project is mainly developed at the Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC) LLNL. Babel started as an internal Lab Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project in 2000 and has been under constant development since then. It is now funded mainly under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science's SciDAC program.

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GLVis is a lightweight OpenGL-based tool for accurate and flexible finite element visualization. It is based on MFEM, a finite element library developed at LLNL. GLVis provides interactive visualizations of general finite element meshes and solutions, both in serial and in parallel. It encodes a large amount of parallel finite element domain-specific knowledge; e.g., it allows the user to view parallel meshes as one piece, but it also gives them the ability to isolate each component and observe it individually. It provides support for arbitrary high-order and NURBS meshes (NURBS allow more accurate geometric representation) and accepts multiple socket connections so that the user may have multiple fully-functional visualizations open at one time. GLVis can also run a batch sequence, or a series of commands, which gives the user precise control over visualizations and enables them to easily generate animations.

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Livermore builds an open-source community around its award-winning HPC package manager.

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LLNL’s Stack Trace Analysis Tool helps users quickly identify errors in code running on today’s largest machines.

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LLNL’s version of Qbox, a first-principles molecular dynamics code, will let researchers accurately calculate bigger systems on supercomputers.

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ROSE, an open-source project maintained by Livermore researchers, provides easy access to complex, automated compiler technology and assistance.

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The Earth System Grid Federation is a web-based tool set that powers most global climate change research.

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hzip 1.0.1 is a C++ library for lossless compression of structured and unstructured meshes composed of cells with hypercube topology.

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The flourishing of simulation-based scientific discovery has also resulted in the emergence of the verification and validation (V&V) and uncertainty quantification (UQ) disciplines. The goal of these emerging disciplines is to enable scientists to make precise statements about the degree of confidence they have in their simulation-based predictions. Here we focus on the UQ discipline, which is essential for validating and verifying computer models.

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ODEPACK is a collection of Fortran solvers for the initial value problem for ordinary differential equation systems. The collection is suitable for both stiff and nonstiff systems and includes solvers for systems given in both explicit and linearly implicit forms.

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zfp is an open-source C/C++ library for compressed floating-point and integer arrays that support high throughput read and write random access.

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Performance analysis of parallel scientific codes is becoming increasingly difficult, and existing tools fall short in revealing the root causes of performance problems. We have developed the HAC model, which allows us to directly compare the data across domains and use data visualization and analysis tools available in other domains.

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